Performance related pay for Parliamentarians is essential


Performance Related PayGiven the dramatic incompetence of Parliament as a whole and the Government in particular since the referendum on 23rd June 2016, this news that once again all MPs will receive a pay rise this year makes it clear that change is needed. Their increase of 2.7% ensures that each MP will earn an additional £2,089 during the next year. Over the last decade both the public sector and private sector have experienced a number of years of significant pay limitations whilst the House of Commons has not experienced this. Some parts of the private sector continue to face a pay freeze and where increases have taken place it is primarily due to where the overall performance of the company and the effectiveness of the individuals concerned has justified such a change. As we appear to be facing a potentially disastrous Brexit and have seen so many jobs already lost and many more at high risk if we leave without a deal there are many people whose finances are at great threat. Meanwhile those who got us into this mess carry on being rewarded as though they have done a good job. It is clear that if Parliament was facing some form of performance related pay, that Parliament as a whole deserves a major pay cut and in the case of many MPs they too deserve a reduction in their pay. Some MPs have worked very hard and it seems reasonable for their personal pay to rise relative to other MPs. Given the document that appears above, it would be fascinating to find out how Peter Dolton would view the current pay rise approaching MPs?

 

 

 

About ianchisnall

I am passionate about the need for public policies to be made accessible to everyone, especially those who want to improve the wellbeing of their communities. I am particularly interested in issues related to crime and policing as well as health services and strategic planning.
This entry was posted in Brighton & Hove, Economics, Education, Parliament and Democracy and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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