Proportional Representation is vital Labour


As the Conference in Brighton and Hove which is part of Sussex closes down and the Labour MPs and the party members return to their own locations the Sussex area like many other parts of the UK is left wondering why the Party refused to consider accepting that 80% of the Party called for Proportional Representation? Here in the Parliamentary website there is a very clear description of Proportional Representation

Proportional representation is an electoral system in which the distribution of seats corresponds closely with the proportion of the total votes cast for each party. For example, if a party gained 40% of the total votes, a perfectly proportional system would allow them to gain 40% of the seats.

So if we take the Sussex situation, we currently have 13 Sussex Conservative MPs, two Labour MPs and one Green MP. If we take the election results from 2017, there were 12 Sussex Conservative MPs, two Labour MPs, one Liberal Democratic MP and one Green MP. The results in 2017 represented 50% for the Conservative Party 30% for the Labour Party, 11% for the Lib Dems and 5% for the Greens. So that would have suggested we would have had 8 or 9 Conservative MPs, 4 or 5 Labour MPs, 2 Lib Dems and 1 Green MP. However far more significantly for the people who live in Sussex would be that those people who had voted Labour across the whole of Sussex would have had a Labour representative that they could have been able to correspond with. The same would be true of the Liberal Democratic voters and the dominance of the Conservative Party would be much lower. The question is what do we do now that the Trade Union and the leadership are ignoring the call from 80% of their own party?

About ianchisnall

I am passionate about the need for public policies to be made accessible to everyone, especially those who want to improve the wellbeing of their communities. I am particularly interested in issues related to crime and policing as well as health services and strategic planning.
This entry was posted in Brighton & Hove, Parliament and Democracy and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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